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An Introduction to Pathology and Biobanking

In my previous post I described how I came to be a pathologist, scientist, and a biobanker. My colleagues have written fascinating posts about their roles on this blog. Many are scientists, some are pathologists and a few are biobankers too, but I don't think they explained the last two roles. So I will fill in that gap today:

Cancer patients meet many people at the BC Cancer Agency who...

A Mix of Influences: Building a Career in Cancer Research and Care

Hello, I’m Dr. Peter Watson, a pathologist, scientist, and biobanker based at the BC Cancer Agency in Victoria.

What influenced me to pursue all these three ‘professions’? Well, the answer is a mix of influences, both genetic and environmental: I come from a family with strong ‘traveling’, ‘medical’ and ‘natural sciences’ genes reinforced over several generations. The ‘Watson’ clan is...

PREDICT: Expanding our Knowledge of Cancer for the Benefit of Patients

For many, the mention of “research” makes one’s eyes gloss over and the mind wander to other topics! But for oncologists at the BC Cancer Agency, the promise of making progress in patient care is of the utmost importance. One project that exemplifies our long-term commitment to improve cancer care is PREDICT.

The PREDICT project is a biobank—a collection of patient information, blood...

What‘s Next: Navigation and Survivorship Research at the BC Cancer Agency Vancouver Island Centre

In wrapping up my posts as guest blogger for the month of May, I would like to tell you about our current activities and the new directions our research is taking.

In April 2013, the navigation research program joined forces with a larger team of researchers and health care providers to form a new research centre called the Alex & Jo Campbell Patient and Family Support Centre. This...

A Systems Approach to Navigation Research at the BC Cancer Agency’s Vancouver Island Centre

Previously, I have shared with you two models of navigation: lay navigation and virtual navigation. This week, I would like to introduce the population-based navigation model to you. This approach, which is also known as systems-based navigation, focuses on how organizations such as the BC Cancer Agency’s Vancouver Island Centre function to support...

Working Towards a Model of Self-Navigation for Cancer Patients

In my last post, I shared with you the research work I have been doing with respect to lay navigation. This week, I would like to tell you about another model for navigation: self navigation using technology or virtual navigation. This model is one of four models that have been identified by the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer as a means for improving...

My Navigation Research at the BC Cancer Agency

For the past four years, my research has been focused on patient navigation. The concept of patient navigation emerged from the United States and the work of Dr. Harold Freemen who discovered that if he engaged the African American women of Harlem, New York, who had been through screening and treatment to connect with other women in their community, he...

Dr. Brad Nelson: Looking Ahead

I hope by now I’ve helped you understand why I am so excited about the future of immunotherapy research and treatment in British Columbia. There is currently a lot of excitement about “immune modulators,” agents that ramp up the immune system. These agents are just emerging from clinical trials and I predict they will become commonplace in a few years. By...

Philanthropy and the Future of Immunotherapy Research

As a concept, immunotherapy fascinates a lot of people: the idea that the immune system can destroy cancer cells anywhere in the body brings a great sense of empowerment about our health. I’ve seen the way this resonates with patients, and I’m so pleased that in the last ten years we’ve established hard evidence that patients with a strong immune response...

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