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Multi-Tasking at the BC Cancer Agency

As a radiation oncologist, my days are quite busy and I have both clinical and research duties. My primary role as a clinician is to provide the most patient-centric care. I use evidence-based data from the latest research and clinical trials to present potential treatment options, benefits and risks to my patients. My patients are always partners in this decision making and together we map...

Translational Research and the Latest Prostate Cancer Discoveries

At the BC Cancer Agency I wear a number of hats: first, I’m a medical oncologist which is a sub-specialist in the drug treatment of cancer. I’m further sub-sub-specialized in that I mainly treat patients with genitourinary (GU) cancers (cancers of the prostate, bladder, testis, kidney and adrenal gland).

I’m also a researcher and study outcomes, biomarkers, and conduct clinical trials...

A Few Thoughts on the Future of Cancer Research and Care

Hi - this week I was hoping to talk a little about how cancer treatment may look five years from now. Honestly speaking, that is something that is really difficult to predict. One of the remarkable things about science and research is that you really do not know where it is going to take you. We often try a treatment for one type of cancer and then it ends up working for a completely different...

Medical Oncology: Improving Outcomes through Research

As a medical oncologist who treats lung and head & neck cancer, I have the opportunity to work with many inspiring patients and families. Their positive outlook and strength give me the motivation to find ways of improving outcomes through research.

Research is something that I think people often equate with working in a lab performing experiments on cells. But at the BC Cancer...

Final Thoughts from Dr. Janine Davies

Many times each month I am aware that the news I’m about to give a patient is devastating. I am buoyed by the fact that a patient, despite going through what may arguably be the most difficult journey of their life, will benefit from prior research. But for the next patient with the same disease, we want to have better ways to diagnose and treat their cancer, and better ways to treat “the...

Medical Oncology: Behind the Scenes

One question I am often asked is, “What exactly does a medical oncologist do?” Obviously we order a lot of chemotherapy, but there’s a lot more going on behind the scenes!

I do a combination of clinical work, research, teaching and administrative activities. My clinical work involves seeing patients, as well as presenting cases at rounds (to get multidisciplinary opinions from my...

Dr. Janine Davies: My Beginnings in Medicine

I write my initial blog in the wake of the flooding in Alberta. Having grown up in Calgary, this hits close to home as family and friends have been displaced. Fortunately for many, this is a temporary (albeit major) inconvenience; but so many others haven’t been so lucky. It makes me think of my patients and their families, who in the blink of an eye, find their lives forever shaped by cancer...

Philanthropy and Breast Cancer Research

Right now, technology is giving us a more refined, clear understanding of cancer at a genomic level. We’ve discovered that breast cancers can have great variability, even within a single patient, and this information is crucial to new therapies.

One area my colleagues and I have been focused on is patients who typically receive chemotherapy before surgery. By performing biopsies and...

My Role at the BC Cancer Agency

First and foremost, I’m a medical oncologist which means I treat cancer patients. I work primarily with breast cancer patients and therapies can include hormonal therapy or chemotherapy.  

I see patients in the clinic three to four days a week, while the rest of my time is devoted to administrative work, my duties as Chair of the Provincial Breast Tumour Group and research activities....

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