Social Media Marketing Specialist , BC Cancer Foundation

“It's important for me to help the community that has helped me get better. If I can help one person live a better quality of life, I will be happy.”

Marc Bains was diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2016 at the age of 31. After learning about the disease through an awareness campaign at his cousin’s school called ‘Testicle Tuesday,’ he did a self-exam.

“A few weeks passed and I noticed something abnormal. After a visit to my GP and subsequent scan it was determined I had cancer. That was my first fight – won!”

Unfortunately, this wouldn’t be his only experience with the testicular cancer.

“My second occurrence was found during a routine checkup four months after my heart transplant. You read right, I had a heart transplant on June 6, 2018. I was 33 years old. This diagnosis hit me hard as I had just turned the corner on recovery.  That being said, the team mobilized fast and we fought it with radiation.”


Marc would go on to have a third occurrence of testicular cancer, found during an appointment with his oncologist to discuss a clinical trial.

“He discovered an enlarged lymph node in my neck, and was confident it was seminoma. It was soon determined that I had two enlarged lymph nodes (neck and chest) and chemotherapy would be the way to go,” says Marc.

Today, Marc is still undergoing treatment and is more positive than ever. “I'm currently in cycle 2/3 at BC Cancer – Vancouver. Another fight I will be sure to win.”

Marc is grateful for the care he has received throughout his treatment journey, from surgery to radiation treatment and chemotherapy.

“The care I received was exceptional. Every diagnosis was met with a plan and a positive outlook. The team is always there to answer questions and address concerns. I've felt at ease knowing I have a group of talented doctors behind me.” 

Marc is sharing his story as part of Testicular Cancer Awareness Month and is encouraging others to share his hopefulness for the future.

“Like many, I hope for a cure.  More so, I hope for advancements in early diagnosis and non-invasive treatment,” he says.

“I want others to know cancer is not the 'killer' it used to be. The teams, technology and the therapy is better. It will continue to get better. The rate of innovation in research and development is accelerating.  Find hope in your team, in the process, in your family and friends and in yourself.  You will get through this.”

We thank Marc for sharing his story to help educate and inspire other men in our community. 

To support testicular cancer research and care, click here.