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Patient perspectives: A source of inspiration

Hello, My name is Dr. Allan Hovan. I’m the provincial practice leader for oral oncology/dentistry at BC Cancer, a position I’ve held for the past 15 years. I also serve as the president of the International Society of Oral Oncology. As part of my role at BC Cancer, I oversee oral care for cancer patients across the province, as well as spearhead new research to push the dial for treatment. It’s a rewarding role that is very patient-focused. Every day I see the extraordinary difference our staff makes in the lives of those affected by this disease. Dr. Allan Hovan. This month, I hope to share...

Introducing April guest blogger Dr. Allan Hovan

Thank you to Dr. Jonathan Loree for updating our community on the latest in colorectal cancer research and care. It is concerning to learn colorectal cancer diagnoses are on the rise in young people, as Dr. Loree explained . Still, I’m confident that through continued philanthropy our efforts to improve detection and treatment will improve these sobering statistics. I am pleased to welcome Dr. Allan Hovan, provincial professional practice leader for oral oncology and dentistry at BC Cancer, to our blog for April. April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month. Dr. Hovan will share his efforts to...

How targeted drugs can improve colorectal cancer outcomes

In addition to the research I mentioned last week, we are also enrolling patients in clinical trials focused on improving outcomes. For example, we have a trial evaluating targeted drugs for patients with a particular mutation in their colorectal cancer called BRAF V600E. BRAF mutations are noted in five to ten per cent of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancers with this mutation are much more aggressive. Patients with it generally have a poor prognosis. We are part of a large international effort to see if we can develop better treatments for patients with this...

New study: Colorectal cancer cases climbing in young people

I mentioned last week that a number of exciting developments are taking place for colorectal cancer research and care. Our hope is that through these projects, we’ll be able to better understand this disease, with the end goal of improving outcomes for the roughly 4,000 diagnosed every year in British Columbia. Today, I’ll tell you a bit more about these developments. new trial provides deeper insight on treatment plans We recently completed a cross-Canada clinical trial testing immunotherapy for colorectal cancer. Previously, it has been shown that immunotherapy works for the five per cent...

New research underway to improve colorectal cancer outcomes

Hello, My name is Dr. Jonathan Loree. I’m a medical oncologist at BC Cancer, specializing in gastrointestinal cancer treatment and research. It is my first time blogging for the BC Cancer Foundation. This month is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, and I’m excited to share with our community the latest advancements in this field. Colorectal cancer remains one of the most common and lethal cancer types in our province, affecting close to 4,000 British Columbians every year. Promising new research now underway is helping us understand the disease and how it develops in different patients. This...

Introducing March guest blogger Dr. Jonathan Loree

Thank you to Dr. Stephen Lam for sharing the results of his game-changing study on lung cancer incidence and screening. It is pleasing to hear of the significant strides BC Cancer has made in this area, and how our donors continue to help bring forth new prevention and treatment strategies. I am pleased to welcome Dr. Jonathan Loree, medical oncologist, to our blog for the month of March – Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Dr. Loree is a new recruit to BC Cancer, where he specializes in colorectal cancer research and care. He will share a number of exciting initiatives underway to improve...

How researchers can detect cancer risk in breath

While lung cancer continues to be among the deadliest diseases today, we know this will change as we find new and more effective ways to detect it earlier. Indeed, we estimate that approximately 80 per cent of those with lung cancer may survive if caught at an earlier stage. As we look toward the future, there are many projects in the works that will help achieve this aim. Using the breath to detect cancer risk With generous support from the BC Cancer Foundation and its donors, we hope to establish what we call a Breathomics laboratory that will detect cancer risk in the breath. The body...

Pollution accounts for 23% of lung cancer deaths, research finds

By next year, we project that lung cancer will be the fifth highest killer among all cancer and non-cancer diseases across Canada. Only about 18 per cent of patients survive five years or more, simply because symptoms often don’t show until it’s too late. With our research, we know that lung cancer is treated earlier – before it spreads outside the air passages – we can change this. We project that over 80 per cent of those with early lung cancer - what we call Stage IA - can survive if the disease is caught early and treatment started. Cynthia’s story: highlighting the importance of early...

Asian women more at risk for lung cancer, research finds

Hello, My name is Dr. Stephen Lam. I'm a distinguished scientist at BC Cancer and the Leon Judah Blackmore Foundation chair in lung cancer research. I'm also the MDS - Rix endowed director of translation lung cancer research and chair of the Provincial Lung Tumour Group at BC Cancer. It has been three years since I last blogged for the BC Cancer Foundation. I am thrilled to report back on the progress we've made to advance research for this disease since. Lung cancer remains deadly, but progress on horizon Lung cancer remains among the deadliest and most prevalent cancers in B.C., Canada and...

Introducing February guest blogger Dr. Stephen Lam

Thank you to Dr. Poul Sorensen for sharing his translational efforts in pediatric cancer research with our community. It is always inspiring to hear how donor-funded research continues to make a tangible difference in the lives of those affected by cancer. I am pleased to welcome Dr. Stephen Lam, distinguished scientist and Leon Judah Blackmore Chair in lung cancer research, back to our blog for February. Dr. Lam’s most recent efforts have uncovered women of Asian descent to be up to several times more susceptible to lung cancer than men in cities with poor air quality. He will explain these...

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