VANCOUVER, B.C. – New results from a clinical trial led by a BC Cancer medical oncologist is offering new hope to patients facing metastatic prostate cancer.

Metastatic prostate cancer is when the cancer has spread beyond the prostate and cannot be cured, but managed with medications used to lower androgen hormone levels (called “androgen deprivation therapy” or “ADT”).

The trial – called the TITAN study – was a randomized double blind placebo-controlled trial that evaluated the addition of Apalutamide, a next generation androgen-receptor inhibitor, to standard androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in patients with mCSPC.

With the intent to accrue a broad spectrum of patients, 1,052 men with metastatic prostate cancer were randomized in this study – including those with both high volume and low volume disease, and those who had received prior docetaxel chemotherapy.

The primary endpoints of the trial focused on radiographic progression-free survival and overall survival. Published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the findings are providing new optimism in the treatment of mCSPC.

“At the first analysis, the trial was positive. Patients experienced a 52% reduction in the risk of progression, and there was a 33% improvement in overall survival,” said Dr. Kim Chi, medical oncologist and Regional Medical Director at BC Cancer - Vancouver, who led the study which was conducted in 23 countries around the world.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among Canadian men and the third most common cause of cancer death. While initial treatments for localized prostate cancer that has not spread are usually successful and five-year survival rates are relatively high, more effective solutions are needed for those patients with advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

Clinical trials represent an important component of providing excellence in patient care. Philanthropic support from BC Cancer Foundation donors continues to fuel vital clinical research happening at BC Cancer, enabling experts like Dr. Chi to continue to accelerate clinically relevant discoveries and bring better treatments to people across B.C. facing cancer.

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