Dr. Marianne Sadar
Provincial Program Leader for Prostate Cancer Research

Dr. Sadar’s career in prostate cancer started at the BC Cancer Agency as a post-doctoral fellow in Dr. Nicholas Bruchovsky’s laboratory. Her research has focused upon discovering new treatments for advanced prostate cancer. Dr. Sadar recently developed an experimental drug that shrinks prostate cancer tumours in the lab and is the first drug in the world that targets the “engine” of the tumour that causes the cancer to grow. 

Dr. Sadar is the author of over 50 peer-reviewed publications, has served on more than 30 scientific panels, and has been a recipient of several prestigious awards, including the Terry Fox Young Investigator Award, Simon Fraser University Alumni Award for Academic Excellence. She is the first non-American to receive the Society of Women in Urology/Society of Basic Urologic Research Award for Excellence in Urologic Research.

You can read Dr. Sadar's blog posts here.

Blog Posts by Dr. Marianne Sadar

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7 blog posts

Looking Ahead

For patients, research is hope. If we’re not doing research then there is nothing in the pipeline for them. For patients that have treatments fail, or no treatment options left, research is new hope for them. Research is absolutely necessary to find new treatments and look at why some fail. While we continue to work on the EPI compounds, there is potential, based on literature that our new EPI compounds could possibly target some female cancers. Because this treatment is tied to the hormones used in these areas of the bodies, we can consider researching use across more than one kind of cancer...

Philanthropy Compresses Time

Philanthropy is a way of speeding up research, often much faster than grant funding. The process to acquire grants takes a long time – it can take years sometimes. For patients looking at the clock and measuring time, that’s terrible that it can takes that long to get research support. Philanthropic dollars can be immediately put to use. The BC Cancer Foundation can fund areas of research that granting bodies may not be able to fund. The discovery of the EPI drug compound was made possible by generous donations, which helped to seed our research work. In 2007, dedicated members of the public...

What EPI Means for Advanced Prostate Cancer

At the BC Cancer Agency Research Centre, my team and I are researching a new drug compound that we developed called EPI. Currently, we are trying to get the legal authorization to use the drug with patients, and to do this we have to show toxicity levels and other requirements to ensure it is safe. We anticipate starting clinical trials with the drug by the end of this year. Patients do ask where we are at, and we are going to be there in less than twelve months – we really are getting close. It’s quite an amazing feeling as a scientist to develop a novel drug, it’s a dream actually. Prostate...

A Eureka Moment of Discovery

The moment of discovery for a scientist is when you know something that no one else in the world knows. These are the moments that carry us, as scientists. Yet there are different degrees of excitement about discoveries. Most are small and incremental, building a bigger picture of how something works. There is one moment in my career that will be etched in my mind forever. This was the moment my technician, Jean, showed me the data of a new drug we were testing in a lab model of advanced prostate cancer. First I looked at the tumour growth rates. Jean was excited and told me that the tumours...

Thinking “Outside of The Box”

I feel very fortunate to have had great mentors throughout my career to date, because they have helped me get to where I am. In the field of Urology, which includes studying prostate cancer research, approximately 13 per cent of all urologists are female, and even fewer are in leadership roles within the field. We really are a minority in this area. I am passionate about female mentorship in research in general. It’s a demanding occupation, and balance of family-work life can be difficult. Cancer research is an enormous field, and to continue discovering cures we need to have as many...

Inspiration & the BC Cancer Agency

I had just returned from Sweden and was offered a postdoctoral position with Dr. Nicholas Bruchovsky. I had returned from overseas after finishing my PhD, and job opportunities in the United States were beckoning me. The BC Cancer Agency has such a great research reputation around the world and so it was so exciting to be offered a chance to do leading work at this high level in my home province, so I accepted the job. And I accepted the job because I felt I could now do work in a field of cancer research that really matters for patients. By having resources and the expertise all in one area...

Home Grown in B.C.

As Doug mentioned, I am the Provincial Program Leader for Prostate Cancer Research at the BC Cancer Agency, in Vancouver. Before I dive into talking prostate cancer research, I’d like to share a bit about me. I’m from B.C., and I grew up in Kamloops but also lived in Kimberley for a while. So you could say that I’m “home-grown,” and I love British Columbia. It’s a beautiful place to live. From the time I was little, I have been interested in discovery and in creative things. In university, I didn’t really know where to start , so my career goals weren’t exactly a straight line. It wasn’t...