First in Canada cancer biobank registers 10,000 participants

VANCOUVER, B.C. – The PREDICT (Personal Response Determinants in Cancer Therapy) program at the BC Cancer Agency has registered 10,000 participants. This number is significant because it is half way to the program’s goal of 20,000 participants – a number which will enable large scale cancer and genomic research. The program launched as a pilot project in 2006, thanks to the generosity of BC...

BC-developed prostate cancer drug holds out hope for clinical trials

VANCOUVER, B.C. – A new potential prostate cancer drug developed by the BC Cancer Agency offers hope where other drugs have failed. EPI-001 was developed by Dr. Marianne Sadar, distinguished scientist, BC Cancer Agency, and Dr. Raymond Andersen, distinguished professor, University of British Columbia. Research published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation confirms that Dr. Sadar’s team...

First-in-Canada technology helps cancer specialists to better detect lung cancer

BC Cancer Foundation donors support major enhancement to lung cancer care
Vancouver – Lung cancer specialists at the BC Cancer Agency now have access to a three-dimensional navigation system that can enhance diagnosis, staging and care for lung cancer patients in BC. The BC Cancer Foundation-funded equipment is the first of its kind to be used in Canada and is newly-installed at the BC Cancer Agency’s Vancouver Centre. “This technology acts as a GPS, providing clear...

Scientists re-write rulebook on breast cancer in landmark global study

VANCOUVER, B.C. – Scientists at the BC Cancer Agency and University of British Columbia have identified new breast cancer genes that could change the way the disease is diagnosed and form the basis of next-generation treatments. Researchers have reclassified the disease into 10 completely new categories based on the genetic fingerprint of a tumour. Many of these genes could offer much-needed...

Darwinian evolution in the deadliest of breast cancers

VANCOUVER, B.C. - BC Cancer Agency scientists have decoded the genetic make-up of triple negative breast cancer, which could lead to more effective treatment. The study, published online today in the international journal Nature, reveals that this form of cancer is not one distinct single entity, but an extremely complex and evolved tumour with an unprecedented range of mutations. Operating with...

Gene links rare and unrelated cancer

An important breakthrough in cancer research
Scientists at the BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, and the University of British Columbia are excited over a discovery made while studying rare tumour types. Dr. David Huntsman, genetic pathologist and director of the Ovarian Cancer Program of BC at the BC Cancer Agency and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute and Dr. Gregg Morin, a lead scientist from the...

New genetic mutations found for non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Substantial gain in knowledge about the disease
Vancouver, July 27, 2011 – BC Cancer Agency scientists have identified a number of new genetic mutations involved in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). This massive cancer-sequencing study, published online in Nature will open a floodgate for researchers around the world to explore the significant number of newly discovered gene mutations and their role in the growth and development of lymphoma cells...

Found: an Achilles Heel of Blood Cancers

Dr. Keith Humphries and researchers from the BC Cancer Agency’s Terry Fox Lab pinpoint a previously unknown gene —MEISI— as a susceptible target for combating many forms of leukemia. Dr. Humphries discovered that MEIS1 allows normal cells in the bone marrow to transform into cancerous cells. When the researchers remove MEIS1 from leukemic cells in the lab, they are able to stop very aggressive...

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