Research moving us closer to personalized medicine

Researchers with the BC Cancer Agency’s Genome Sciences Centre developed two new approaches – ALEXASeq and Trans-ABySS – to characterize how the information in genes is expressed. These modes represent significant steps towards cost-effective surveying of all genetic information in a tumour, moving us closer to personalized medicine.

BC researchers uncover new ovarian cancer gene — ARID1A

Researchers with the Ovarian Cancer Research (OvCaRe) program at the BC Cancer Agency and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute found a major new tumour-suppressing gene — ARID1A. Mutations are frequent in this gene and inhibit the gene’s suppressing abilities in two types of ovarian cancer — clear cell carcinoma and endometrioid carcinoma.

Ovarian cancer researchers request practice changes to protect against ovarian cancer

VANCOUVER, BC - Gynecologic oncologists with the Ovarian Cancer Research Program at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH) and the BC Cancer Agency have begun an important campaign that will reduce deaths from ovarian cancer. They are asking all BC gynecologists to change surgical practice to fully remove the fallopian tube when performing hysterectomy or tubal ligation. Current practice leaves the...

Personalized genome sequencing in cancer treatment—a major breakthrough in care

August 9, 2010, Vancouver, BC – Researchers at the BC Cancer Agency Genome Sciences Centre have provided the first published example of genome-scale RNA and DNA sequencing of a tumour to aid in clinical decision making and therapeutic choice. Published today in the journal Genome Biology, the research focuses on a rare tumour of the tongue, which had progressed to metastatic disease. The rarity...

BC scientists develop new drug candidate for prostate cancer

June 15, 2010, Vancouver, B.C. – Scientists in B.C. have developed a unique experimental drug, EPI-001, that shrinks prostate cancer tumours in the lab. The breakthrough came from the research groups of Dr. Marianne Sadar, Senior Scientist, BC Cancer Agency, an agency of the Provincial Health Services Authority, and Dr. Raymond Andersen, Professor, University of British Columbia. EPI-001 targets...

BC Cancer Agency researchers find presence of macrophages (scavenger cells) can predict treatment outcome in Hodgkin lymphoma

March 10, 2010, Vancouver, B.C. - New research published today in the New England Journal of Medicine sheds new light on which Hodgkin lymphoma patients are likely to relapse after receiving treatment. BC Cancer Agency researchers have discovered that the number of macrophages – a type of white blood cell that normally scavenges foreign material – found in a patient’s tumour had a strong...

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